The WXO Experimental Campfires are a playground for experience pioneers around the world to connect, inspire, and challenge each other. In each of these Campfire reports, you'll find inspiration and information that will help you create better experiences, and become a better experience designer. We hope you enjoy them, and to see you in a Campfire soon!
Success stories can inspire us to greatness and equip us with tried-and-tested tools to help us get there. But we can learn from failures, too. We asked our experience experts to anonymously share some of the worst experiences they’ve attended, as well as some of their own biggest flops. 
Accessible arts expert Beth Rypkema, immersive storyteller and Meow Wolf alum Justin Stucey, and Raven Sun Creative founder Louis Alfieri step up to share a project they're working on, the challenges faced, and their hopes for the future.
Professor of Storytelling Dr Moniek Hover and Dr Licia Calvi on the difference between stories of individual and collective heroes, how to use empathy to connect with audiences, and the proper pronunciation of Vincent Van Gogh.
In honour of Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi, who passed away in October 2021 at the age of 87, we wanted to delve deeper into flow – and Csikszentmihalyi’s eight steps into it – to discover how we might use it to design more engaging experiences. 
Our Campfire let the sparks fly after Rob Morgan's Firestarter talk on the power of AR, wondering whether it takes you further away from reality – or pulls you right in.
In the spirit of experimentation, for this week’s Campfire we decided to do our first two-parter, following on from last week’s discussion of the difference between services and experiences. We invited members of our Founding Circle to go a little deeper by thinking about how we can take a service, mess around with it, and upgrade it into a true experience.
For our very first, very experimental WXO Campfire, we got sparks flying by beginning at the end. We asked participants to fuse their thinking on how to design better endings to experiences, which too often end up being more whimper than bang.